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Here are a couple of examples The Church of Wifi distributes rainbow tables for penetration testing, which I think is a legitimate use case. On the other hand if you recall when lulzsec was doing their thing they released a large list of compromised passwords, while not legal the data wasn't released with a restricted license per say. Also what if you can't find the origins or a license for the data in the torrent, then what?

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    Protocols for distribution of open data have little or nothing to do with the content on them. Protocols may be used by more than one community, even if one community is using it for activity which is illegal in some region. And you prompted me to ask a question about BT : opendata.stackexchange.com/q/283/263 – Joe May 12 '13 at 16:47
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I guess it comes down to legality. Rainbow tables aren't illegal per se, so as long as they are released as open data, everything should be fine.

Also what if you can't find the origins or a license for the data in the torrent, then what?

Then it's probably not open data and not really relevant for Open Data SE. Even worse, the data could have been obtained illegally, which is definitely not what we're going for here.

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